#TBT:Passing on Round 2-Trade the Picks, A Habit of Failure

Ever since the Brian Burke era, the Vancouver Canucks haven’t had very much luck with the 2nd round pick of the NHL Draft. With the odd exception, the Canucks’ management, whomever is at the helm, would take heat for not using those 2nd round picks to build within the organization. Many of those 2nd round picks since 1998 were used in trade deals, but the Canucks did not trade all of them away. So from 1998 to present, let’s see what the 2nd round pick has garnered the Canucks via trade or prospect. How did the team fare overall?

Brian Burke Era

1998: Canucks chose Artem Chubarov in the 2nd round, 31st overall. He spent seven years in the Canucks organization before heading to Russia to play in the KHL. He played 228 NHL regular season games and 27 playoff games. Chubarov is better known for his funny little NHL record.

1999: Brian Burke sent this selection (31st overall) was sent to Colorado (via Washington) as compensation to acquire Marc Crawford as the new head coach of the Vancouver Canucks.

2000: Traded to Atlanta for a 2nd round pick in 2001, plus a swap of the 3rd round picks in the 2001 draft.

2001: The pick traded to Atlanta was turned around in 2000 (42nd overall) in a trade to Nashville for Drake Berehowsky.

2002: Chosen 49th overall was Kiril Koltsov. In the efforts of trying to find the next great Russian player, Burke missed on this pick. Koltsov did not play one game for the Vancouver Canucks but spent 102 games with the Manitoba Moose, the then-AHL affiliate of the big club, before going to Russia.

2003: Marc-Andre Bernier, a right winger,  was chosen 60th overall in the 2nd round. He, like Koltsov before him, did not register one NHL game under his belt, but spent his career in the minors, bouncing from the AHL to the ECHL.

Dave Nonis Era

2004: The 61st pick overall was traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins for backup net-minder,Johan Hedberg. Hedberg only played 21 games for the Canucks with a GAA of 2.52 and a SV % of .900. That was as steep price to pay for a backup goalie for such a short term.

2005: Mason Raymond. One of the 2nd round picks that worked out for the Canucks, for the most part. Raymond played 279 games for the Canucks with one 25 goal season. Most of all, for about four seasons, we the fans, were entertained how many times Raymond fell on the ice, without assistance of a shove, almost each and every game.

2006: The 46th overall pick was traded to the Buffalo Sabres for goalie, Mika Noronen. If you thought Hedberg was an expensive trade, Noronen played only 4 games for the Canucks. With his .870 SV% and his GAA 3.52, Nonis was fleeced.

2007: Taylor Ellington was chosen 33rd overall in an inside-out trade with Buffalo and LA for Dan Cloutier. Ellington spent the majority of his hockey career in the ECHL and was last seen playing in Denmark last season.

Mike Gillis Era

2008:  Yann Sauve was chosen 41st overall. He spent the better part of the last six years in the Canucks’ system. He was a call up for the big club playing eight games, scoring no points. Sauve is now in Springfield, IL playing for the Columbus Blue Jackets farm team, The Falcons.

2009:  Anton Rodin was chosen 53 overall. The Swedish right-winger is currently playing the SweHL for Brynas IF Galve. Another pick really not panning out for the Canucks.

2010: The 55th pick overall was traded to Buffalo for Steve Bernier, and then traded to LA in 2009  and the pick was eventually used by the Bluejackets. Make sense? Not really, but neither have some of the Canucks picks.

2011: The Canucks chose David Honzik, a Czech goalie who played in the QMJHL. Nothing has progressed beyond Honzik’s junior career and hasn’t been seen on any hockey radar since the 2013-2014 season.

2012: Alexandre Mallet, a left wing prospect chosen 57th overall. He played a few years in the AHL and ECHL system for the Canucks until recently. He is now part of the ECHL Stockton Thunder, an affiliate team of the New York Islanders.

2013: CORRECTION: The Canucks did not have a 2013 pick due to a trade in order to get Derek Roy . Along with the pick was Kevin Connaughton. However they did have another pick in the 1st round and turned it into Hunter Shinkaruk. As per @s0ya on twitter.

No 2nd rounder in the 2013 NHL Draft, but Shinkaruk comes as an additional 1st rounder along with Bo Horvat.

No 2nd rounder in the 2013 NHL Draft (Derek Roy), but Shinkaruk comes as an additional 1st rounder along with Bo Horvat. Photo Credit: Vancouver Sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Jim Benning Era

2014: A possible goalie of the future in Thatcher Damko, who played in goal for Team USA in the WJC. In development and we are pretty excited to see what happens.

 

Until now, it seems the Canucks management failed to see the importance and true value of the 2nd round picks, especially when Burke and Nonis were at the helm. With the  scouting background of Jim Benning as an asset, perhaps this is a trend that has been bucked and we can look to the future of depth and building within the system. We can all hope.

In 2015, that 2nd round pick has again been traded, but Sven Baertchi looks like his worth the price ,so far since being acquired, down in Utica. Benning and others seem Baertchi as a future regular NHL’er  with the proper development. Travis Green knew how to motive and develop Sven in the WHL, and it could be another wonderful realtionship in Utica.

*Fingers crossed*

@Aviewfromabroad

 

Pat Quinn: Hockey’s St. Patrick

When I headed towards Rogers Arena last night, my husband sent me a text cautioning me of what I might see when I entered the gate:

Keep your eyes peeled when you come in Gate 16. It was quite the rogues gallery when I came

As I was walking down Abbot Street  (now Pat Quinn Way) to my regular gate, Orland Kurtenbach and his wife walked by for the unveiling of the street sign on Abbot St. and Pacific Boulevard. As I came inside, I saw Kirk McLean talking with a few others. Usually, I don’t get phased by seeing McLean, he’s in and around the arena quite a bit during the regular season, but yesterday, it felt different. There was an energy the minute I set foot through the doors. As I waited for the elevator to take me to Level 5, I started recognizing more faces, and then I thought I saw Markus Naslund which made me do a double take and I wasn’t sure, but I was… Anyway, everyone was in great anticipation of the pre-game ceremony.

When I met up with my husband in our section, he told me of some of the people he saw gathered at Gate 16. He said, in a cluster, there was Brian Burke, George McPhee, Jim Robson and Bob Nicholson. Rogues, maybe, but hockey’s upper echelon, definitely. As we were having our pre-game dinner, I believe we both felt at a loss for words. All  we could do was smile just think of how much Pat Quinn meant to hockey and we in Vancouver were so fortunate to have felt his impact so profoundly.

Canucks President, Trevor Linden, bookends the new commemorative sign of Pat Quinn Way" with Vancouver mayor, Gregor Robertson during the unveiling, renaming ceremony. Photo Credit: NHL.com

Canucks President, Trevor Linden, bookends the new commemorative sign of Pat Quinn Way” with Vancouver mayor, Gregor Robertson during the unveiling, renaming ceremony. Photo Credit: NHL.com

The unveiled "Pat Quinn Way". Quinn meant so much to the Canucks and to the city of Vancouver, it was truly a fitting tribute.

The unveiled “Pat Quinn Way”. Quinn meant so much to the Canucks and to the city of Vancouver, it was truly a fitting tribute.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 When the actual ceremony began, Hockey Hall of Fame inductee and legendary broadcaster, Jim Robson hosted the evening. It was respectful, memorable without being too long winded. It was perfect. Rick Ley, Bobby Clarke, Cliff Fletcher, Ron Toigo, Markus Naslund, Stan Smyl, Trevor Linden, Pavel Bure, Kirk McLean, Bob Nicholson and Orland Kurtebach all joined in for the on-ice ceremony. But it was the amazing entourage of people who weren’t shown publicly that astounded many. Washington Capitals GM, George McPhee, singer Michael Buble, Flames President- Brian Burke were amongst the many who gathered at Rogers Arena on that very special night.

Seeing people in the hockey world pay their respects to a man that meant so much to this game, to this city and especially to this team. Pat Quinn had an impact everywhere he want into hockey, but nowhere to the extent of Vancouver. I was still a young girl (11 or 12) when Pat Quinn took charge of the Vancouver Canucks, but I do remember the less than half full Pacific Coliseum before his arrival and how things changed when he put his stamp on the team. There was a culture, there was a vibe, there was respectability associated with the Canucks that lacked in previous regimes.

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Highlights of the Pat Quinn Ceremony

  • Seeing the array of team jerseys that was associated with Pat Quinn in the world of hockey. Even more so the people who wore them out as they were introduced to Rogers Arena.
  • The appropriateness of the St. Patrick’s Day to remember The Big Irishman.
  • Bagpipes and Mark Donnelly singing his rendition of “Irish Eyes Are Smiling” paid a wonderful musical tribute.
  • The combatants of the night, were the two NHL teams Quinn had the most success with as a head coach.
  • All the dignitaries throughout the night that went on-air with kind words to say about Pat.
  • Seeing his daughters and granddaughter with the ceremonial puck drop was a perfect way to end the ceremony.
  • The one that impacted me the most during the ceremony was seeing Bure, Linden and McLean together in their old “Skate Logo” jersey brought the crowd to a rousing cheer. Memories of a team from yesteryear brought many smiles and tears of joy to some present at the arena. Most significant part of that trio together was, as they were leaving the ice after the ceremony, Linden patted Bure on the back and shared what seemed like kinds words with the Russian Rocket. Two men, who have not always seen eye to eye, as teammates and people, put their differences aside for the night to remember Pat Quinn. That’s speaks volumes of how much Pat Quinn meant to people.

For those that missed the ceremony last night, or those who just want to see it again, here is the ceremony in its entirety.

 

@Aviewfromabroad

NHL blows it again. Perception is everything and once again, they look bad.

So Aaron Rome was suspended for four games by the NHL and its new interim disciplinarian Mike Murphy. I like most were pretty shocked at the number of games. I figured the league would give Rome at least a game and probably two for the late hit.

It wasn’t a blindside hit; it was a late hit with a very unfortunate result. But Nathan Horton is done for the series with a severe concussion and in some respects it may be fair that Aaron Rome misses the remainder of the final as well.

I accept the suspension as a fan, but I what I cannot accept is the part of the process that was used to arrive at the decision. This from the NHL transcript of the decision:

Q.  Is there a formula equating playoff games to regular-season games?

MIKE MURPHY:  Yes.  It’s more severe.

Q.  Is there a number?

MIKE MURPHY: No.  I wish there was a number.  There’s not.  You have to feel that.  I know in the past when we had a playoff suspension, I remember the Pronger elbow going back, the Lemieux hit going on, that was two, Pronger was one.  I spoke to the gentleman who issued the two.  Wanted his formula, talked to him about it.  I’m talking about Brian Burke.  I don’t like to mention people who I deal with.  He was one gentleman who I did speak with. There’s a lot of other people I spoke with, too, not just Brian.

Excuse me?

The NHL is truly stupid sometimes. How does it look when you go to another team’s GM, a GM that was fired by the Vancouver Canucks and ask him his opinion on a suspension? Employees of other teams should never be consulted on discipline issues, period. The optics of that move are absurd but until last night with Nathan Horton lying concussed on the ice, the NHL has never cared about optics. So should fans now be wondering if Colin Campbell was “consulted”? The man that excused himself of his role prior to the start of the series, saying it had nothing to do with his son playing for the Bruins? Sure, I’m getting the conspiracy thing going, but the way the NHL runs things they really don’t give you much of a choice.

I do believe that Burke was probably neutral in his recommendations to Murphy but the NHL has to be smarter in the roles that conflicting parties have in these decisions.

Before I start getting blasted by profanity laced comments and being labeled a homer, read above again. I accept and to some degree agree with the suspension based on the fact that Horton is “out for the series.” In the future the NHL better give a little more thought to who it “consults” on discipline issues. If they can’t do it within their own league office circles and not consult GM’s of other teams then that is a major flaw in the process and one that makes the NHL look bush league…again.