10 Things: I Hate About You, Canucks fans

Sitting pretty and quietly at The Rog

Sitting pretty and quietly at The Rog

 

As I visit the twitter verse, Facebook pages, fan sites and just a simple conversation with a good number of Canucks fans, I at times want to ram my head through a wall. Why? To simplify it for some, no matter what happens with the team, some of them are just not satisfied…with anything.

I decided to put together a short list about what I hate about Canucks fans, from a Canucks fan.

1. Over-analyzing trades: There isn’t a fan base in the whole league who would break apart a trade and find as many ways as to why it was such a terrible trade for the Vancouver Canucks. It’s been nearly two years, and the Cody Hodgson/Zack Kassian trade is ripped apart on a daily, no make that hourly basis here in Vancouver. Hell, some are still talking about the Cam Neely trade from the 1980’s! Give it up already! Deal with it, and carry on. For my two cents on the Hodgson/Kassian trade. The immediacy of a competent 3rd line centre is making this trade look more like a ‘mistake’. The Canucks don’t really *need* a power forward type of player currently. It will also take Kassian to develop to see if he will make the grade. Don’t believe me? Two words: Todd Bertuzzi.
2. Blame Luongo: No matter if this man has a good game or a great game, there are many out there that would rather rip into him rather than give him any credit. He is the first to get blamed, and the last to get praise. When the Canucks lose 4-1 to any team, immediately, some fans cry, “Luongo let in four goals!” It is hardly ever, “Wow, the team only has one goal to support an effort by Bobby Lu.” I know he has to be the money guy, and at times he has been, but when there is no goal scoring, a goalie can only keep out so many on his own. Remember that “own goal”, Vancouver so graciously gave Montreal? There was a tweeter that RT’ed someone bringing up that Luongo should have had his skate right at the post so that would not have gone in. Well, smarty pants, Luongo wasn’t exactly expecting an error of communication in front of him between two defensemen that he should be guarding his post oh so dearly. If that was Schneider or even Lack in net, no one would blame them whatsoever. So, has Schneider got his first win yet on a winless NJ team? I’m sure Jersey fans are blaming their guys between the pipes for that too.
3. National Lampoon’s Anthem: I’m not sure what is wrong with some that come to the arena and hoot and holler all throughout the anthem(s), but it seems to happen way too often. How about we show the singer, the countries and yourselves a little respect and either just sing, or just shut the f*** up, please! There is no worse arena in the league that does that. Have some national pride.
4. Bronx Cheering Inappropriately: You realize how this all started right? It was the Yankees fans razzing the opposing team’s pitchers that just gave up a crap ton of runs to their team. Translate that into hockey and it’s when your team has a good lead, and the opposing team’s goalie lets in so many goals, he is either pulled or continues the frustration on the blue ice. So when Carey Price has a 1-1 tie, you can’t start rousing the “CAARRRRRREEEEEEEEE” chant. Tactless, unacceptable, and just down right makes not only you, but the rest of us look stupid.
5. Diminishing The “W”:Winning pretty or winning ugly have a common denominator, can you guess? I will give you a hint, it starts with a Wih– and ends with a “ning”. Now, I’m not sure, but I believe the objective of the game is to score more goals than the opponent. Whether is 12-1 or 2-1, both types of game equate to the same thing at the end of 60 minutes or 60 to 65 minutes or through to the shoot out, two points. Now, although I would love to see the Canucks win with pretty goals, keeping their opponents on their heels, an ugly win still counts. If the team is struggling but still winning, it does make it easier for them to get a groove and feel less pressure to live up to the expectations. Take the two points, know it can get better, but two points now is just as important as two points in March.
6. The Game Starts at…:So get your asses in your seats and get ready for game time! So many times, I am in my seat, and I see between 1/4 to 1/3 of Rogers Arena and it takes well into the first period before the seats looks more full than not. Is it the beer lines? Is it the entrance door staff? Whatever it is, when the puck is dropped, a good number of the Rogers Arena Contingent can’t seem to be on time for the start of the game.
7. “The Sellout” Crowd: Yes, technically if all tickets are sold, but not all seats are filled, it’s a sellout. And I don’t really blame the Canucks for this one. You can have people buy the tickets, but you can’t head to their houses and places of employment or hire a F/T person to individually call the season ticket holders who leave their seats empty for games they aren’t attending to show up come game time. If you have tickets, but cannot attend the game, instead of wasting them and not having success re-selling them, how about donating them to a local charity? I’m sure a worker, or a prize winner would love to have that as a bonus.
8. Gossip Girls/Guys: Whether a rumour be true or not, I find it extremely laughable how much some out in Canuckland, eat the gossip cookies like it was their last meal. People get fed a rumour about the team, and next thing you know, a player was traded as a result of that rumour. Who really knows but those with the inside track. If someone brings up points to oppose the popular beliefs, they are tagged as “ignorant” or aren’t “in the know” of the inner dealings, feelings and wheelings of the Vancouver Canucks. Ask yourself, unless you were a fly in that jock strap, are you an insider?
9. Rogers Library errr Arena: I am not quite sure what has happened over the last few years, but the once electric atmosphere of Rogers Arena/GM Place, is more these days seemingly a part of the Vancouver Public Library branches. You don’t have to have permission or repeatedly be told to “MAKE SOME NOISE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!” by DJ Dave. Make some on your own accord. Have some fun, cheer on the boys when they are down, make those around see how much you enjoy the game and your team. Having to be prompted to cheer on your team is right up there with Inappropriate Bronx Cheering. The only time that place gets loud is when there is a big round of boo’s or when a Canucks goal is scored.
10. “Gotta Catch the Skytrain Before The Rush”: Really? You’re going to get out of the seat that you paid a good amount of $$$ for because you want to be the first to get on the Skytrain home? I don’t care if the Canucks look like paint gun victims and the goal light is permanently red at the Canucks end, I don’t *get it*. . It could be an amazing victory by the home team, but between 3-7 minutes to go in the third period, a mass exodus of Canucks “fans”, make their way for the exits and are homeward bound. Why can’t you just sit another few minutes and finish the game? It’s only a few more minutes? If you’re not standing in a line up to get out of the arena, you’re standing at the Skytrain to get a fare ticket for your ride home or elbowing your way to a cab. I have been to 27 arenas in the NHL, and the Canucks fans are by far the worst at leaving the arena early and so many other fan bases comment on it after seeing it on TV and shake their heads like you caused them to have Parkinson’s disease. So do yourselves and your fellow Canucks fans a favour, sit the f*** down and finish the game. It’s embarrassing.

First blog of the year and I have made sure I endeared myself to the general fan base. Virtual high-fives all around!

Justine Galo

@Aviewfromabroad

Bottom 6 Still Needs a Fix

Sukh Purewal – Canuckscorner.com: 

Yes, it was just the first game of 82, but it looks like a problem that has plagued the Canucks the last few seasons is going to be a problem once again. The bottom 6. No one on the fourth line played more than 5 minutes against the San Jose Sharks. Dale Weise led the way playing 4:49. Tom Sestito played 3:28 and Zac Dalpe played 3:19 and very little if any of that in the third. That’s not a winning formula. It puts too much of a strain on the rest of the team. Stanley Cup winning teams have third and fourth lines that can play in most situations. The Canucks haven’t had that luxury since 2010-2011. Coincidently, that team went to game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final.

Brad Richardson, who was supposed to be the third line centre this season, played just 12 minutes. His line mate Mike Santorelli played 14 minutes and Jannik Hansen played almost 16 minutes. You can count the number of chances the bottom 6 forwards had in the Sharks game Thursday night on one hand. A strong forecheck by Santorelli gave Booth an open look that Niemi swallowed up.

An upgrade to the bottom 6 is necessary. It was necessary all summer. It was necessary all last season. It’s an issue that Mike Gillis just has not been able to solve, but needs to solve if he wants his team to make a run deep into playoffs. Whether it’s promoting from within and giving Kellan Lain a chance, making another trade (Dalpe was acquired from the Hurricanes on the weekend), or dipping a toe into the remaining free agent pool. Gillis has to do something quick and improve his team, especially because they can’t beat up on the dreadful Northwest division anymore.

CanucksCorner.com welcomes Sukh Purewal to our blogging team and we look forward to his contributions this season.


 

 

What to Expect When You’re Expecting Goaltending


This post is a public service announcement to all Canucks fans, new, old and bandwagon:

Roberto Luongo does not play well in October.

To the faithful Luongo lovers and shameless Luongo apologists like myself, this should not come as a surprise. Luongo is perhaps the most polarizing figure in Vancouver sports. Fans all over the league either love him or hate him, and the same is true in the city of Vancouver. And yet every October at the beginning of every season, people are surprised when Luongo gets off to a slow start. Here are Luongo’s stats from October of the last 5 years, not including the lockout shortened session of last season.

Season      GP       W       L       OTL     GAA     SV%     SHO    
2011-12 7 3 3 1 3.54 .869 0
2010-11 7 2 3 2 2.93 .907 0
2009-10 12 6 6 0 2.79 .902 1
2008-09 10 6 4 0 2.98 .902 2
2007-08 11 4 7 0 2.91 .903 0
   

The October statistics aren’t exactly first team all-star material, but of course they don’t tell the entire story of how these seasons went. Love him or hate him, he happens to be the best goaltender ever to pull on a Canucks jersey. Here are Luongo’s stats for the last 5 full seasons of play.

Season      GP       W       L       OTL     GAA     SV%     SHO    
2011-12 55 31 14 8 2.41 .920 5
2010-11 60 38 15 7 2.11 .928 4
2009-10 68 40 22 4 2.57 .913 4
2008-09 54 33 13 7 2.34 .920 9
2007-08 73 35 29 9 2.38 .917 6
   

@strombone1: Happy October everyone!!! Or as I like to call it: How did that go in?

Even Luongo knows that October is generally not a strong month for him. At least he can have some fun with it. If the Canucks can get through October with an even record, it should shape up to be a great season.

Change is the Only Sure Thing for Canucks


I will be writing a series of posts on the Canucks through the summer, focusing on sections of the club, from players to management. Today’s post is about the management of the club.

This was a wasted year for the Canucks. It has taken me awhile to get to this blog post, and it’s likely because I have largely been indifferent about the team performances this season. If playoff ticket demand is any indication, many fans feel the same way as I do. As a fan that is difficult to say. I always like to have a positive spin on situations – hey, Luongo almost had that – but this year was too much like last year: Shorter than expected.

There are positives for the Canucks in the last couple years: more wins than losses, amazing goaltending, some wonderful performances, and 2 more Northwest Division titles.

There are also negatives: poor player management choices from the draft on up, horrible defensive blunders despite being a defensive minded team, consecutive 1st round exists from the playoffs, and oh yeah: The Northwest Division is one of the weakest in the NHL. There’s a false sense of security in winning the Northwest Division title. It’s a guaranteed top 3 seed in the playoffs, but it allows the Canucks to play mediocre hockey and believe that they are playing better than they are. In the two President’s Trophy winning seasons, the Canucks were the only team to make the playoffs from the Northwest Division. This year, the Minnesota Wild were the 8th seed.

The jury is decidedly out on Mike Gillis’ tenure so far.

There are many hits – Gillis does seem to have a talent for getting players to re-sign for the so-called “Hometown Discount” – Sedins, Bieksa, and others. However, some other free agent signings have been regrettable – Sundin and Demitra (R.I.P. – no disrespect) among them.

The drafting has been mediocre, and the trading worse. Granted, you don’t always get a roster player out of a draft pick, and the Canucks have had late picks due to their regular season success, but the Canucks have traded away numerous picks and prospects for not much in return. Michael Grabner, Steve Bernier and a 1st round draft pick were traded for Keith Ballard. Kevin Connauton and a 2nd round pick were traded at the deadline for Derek Roy, who looks to be a pure rental. Since the Canucks were swept in the first round, that rental was short lived. Cody Hodgson was traded away for Zack Kassian. Hodgson is now a nearly a point-a-game player with the Sabres, while Zack was occasionally scratched for his inconsistent effort.

And finally, the goaltending debacle controversy was “solved” by trading Cory Schneider at the draft for New Jersey’s 9th overall pick. This might prove to be the worst trade the Canucks have ever made, this side of Cam Neely for Barry Pederson. The Canucks traded away their #1 goaltender for a draft pick (Bo Horvat – a fine young player from the London Knights) and no roster players that might be able to help out the Canucks right now. Schneider stands to inherit the goaltending throne of Martin Brodeur in New Jersey, and will no doubt flourish behind New Jersey’s defensive style of play. It’s not fair to Horvat, who will be compared to Schneider for years to come, or to Luongo, who will once again resume the #1 role under the microscope of the Vancouver media and fans.

No Surprises – Stanley Cup Playoffs by Seed

The 2012 Los Angeles Kings are the only 8th seed in the Conference seeding era to have won a Stanley Cup.

 

Much has been said with respect to the so-called “President’s Trophy Curse“. I’ve been told and it has been tweeted that it’s bad luck to win the President’s Trophy, and people love to cheer for the Cinderella underdog teams. Add hockey superstition to the mix, and well, no player touches any trophy except the Stanley Cup, if they’re lucky enough to win it.

If you actually believe that the President’s Trophy is bad luck, first of all, you’re a dummy. Secondly, here are some statistics that may surprise you.

The current Conference Seeding style of playoffs has been in place for 18 seasons, since the 1993-94 season. In that time, the President’s Trophy winner has been in the Stanley Cup Final 7 times: 1994 Rangers, 1995 Wings, 1999 Stars, 2001 Avalanche, 2002 Wings, 2008 Wings, 2011 Canucks. The President’s Trophy winner has gone on to win the cup 5 out of those 7 times. The 2004 Lightning were a non-President’s 1 seed that also won the cup.

Division winners seeded 3rd or better have been in the final 22 times, winning 14 cups. Breaking it down:

  • 1st seed has been in the final 9 times, winning 6 cups
  • 2nd seed has been in the final 10 times, winning 6 cups
  • 3rd seed has been in the final 3 times, winning 2 cups

Middle seeds 4th or 5th seeds have made the final 6 times, winning 3 cups.

Cinderellas seeded 6th or worse have made the final 7 times. Out of those, only the 8th seed LA Kings have won the cup in their amazing run in 2012, defeating the 1st seeded Canucks, 2nd seeded Blues and 3rd seeded Coyotes consecutively on their way to the cup final.

Year by year, here are the Stanley Cup final matches:

2012: (8) LAK over (6) NJD
2011: (3) BOS over (1) VAN
2010: (2) CHI over (7) PHI
2009: (4) PIT over (2) DET
2008: (1) DET over (2) PIT
2007: (2) ANA over (4) OTT
2006: (2) CAR over (8) EDM
2004: (1) TBL over (6) CGY
2003: (2) NJD over (7) ANA
2002: (1) DET over (3) CAR
2001: (1) COL over (1) NJD
2000: (4) NJD over (2) DAL
1999: (1) DAL over (7) BUF
1998: (2) DET over (4) WAS
1997: (3) DET over (2) PHI
1996: (2) COL over (4) FLA
1995: (5) NJD over (1) DET
1994: (1) NYR over (7) VAN

What does this all mean? It’s pretty clear that home ice advantage is exactly that – an advantage. If your team is one of the top two seeds, it’s looking good. But before you plan the parade, you’ve still got to play all the games. Every season has twists and turns, and with the parity of the teams in the last few years, you never know.