Nobody Likes Us, Who Cares: Ways to Survive the Post-Season

Over the last few years, the Canucks have become one of those team that other fans just love to hate. It used to bother me, but I’ve gotten used to it, and actually relish it. It’s not different coming into the 2015 NHL playoffs. All the media and fan experts have chosen the Calgary Flames to win this series. Let’s never mind the fact the Canucks have finished ahead of the Flames in the regular season standings. Let’s overlook the fact the Canucks haven’t played with a healthy top 6 blue-line for about a 1/3 of the season and managed to find ways to win. I could go on, but it’s a list of redundancy. Rodney Dangerfield, the Canucks are, and like in the past, we will use it to our advantage. Remember, #EmbraceTheHate ? Why not do it again.

Here are some ways to survive the playoffs as a Canucks fan:

  1. Believe: Whether the Canucks are the underdog, the favourite, the dark horse- part of your job as a fan is to believe. Don’t shake your belief even if they are getting their ass kicked in a game 5-1. That’s why they call it a series. You have to win four games to be declared a winner.
  2. Cup-less Argument: Despite not winning a Stanley Cup, the Vancouver Canucks are the Canadian team closest to winning one in the last 10 years. Sure the Oilers made the ’06 finals, but in all sincerity, they weren’t winning that Cup. Unfortunately for us Canucks fans, neither did the Canucks in 2011. However, they are the most recent, and therefore the most relevant. Just remind the Flames fans, sure they have one Cup victory but it’s not like any of those players from the 1989 champions will be lacing up the skates and bringing them to victory. New teams, new outlooks, different expectations. And one more thing, good on us for sticking to a team that has yet to win a cup.We’re not jumping on bandwagons of cup winners because that’s the cool thing to do. Loyalty is a good thing.
  3. Riot Jokes: Anyone who brings up the riots of 2011, usually don’t have much wit to match and will recycle an old joke until they are blue in the face. Whether you’re on twitter, Facebook or just talking amongst friends, the riots jokes are lame. If that’s the case, almost every college campus during the football Bowl games, Montreal etc have to be included in those jokes. But really? They are over, the perpetrators are being dealt with or have been sentenced. The true colours of Vancouverites came out the next morning when volunteers cleaned up the city, boarded up the windows and made the city whole again in the aftermath.
  4. Sedin “Sisters”: If I were Daniel and Henrik, I’d just score a ton of goals to shut them up. However, if you’re immature enough to demean the more feminine gender, I don’t know if I really want you in my circle. “They skate like girls.”I’m sure they still skate faster than you. The grotesque innuendos of incest; soft feminine qualities are again arguments for the dim-witted. Why bother getting in arguments with such childish and tactless ‘banter’.  Just say words like “Art Ross” “Hart” “Ted Lindsay” and they will understand. Those are awards Daniel and Henrik have won. But for the most part, Sedinery speaks for itself.
  5. Love Thy City: When the arguments of the cities involved comes up and you’re getting Calgary monkey dung thrown your way (literally- they have a zoo with monkeys, and figuratively), just flash a picture of Vancouver and remind them that the brown perma-frost like substance they call grass, is about as good as it gets in their parts.
    Any angle of Vancouver is better than any angle of Calgary and it's year-round look of brown permafrost they call 'grass'.

    Any angle of Vancouver is better than any angle of Calgary and it’s year-round look of brown permafrost they call ‘grass’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 It’s never easy being a Canucks fan, and it’s even harder during the playoffs when the rest of Canada could cheer you on, they choose not to. That’s ok. As we have hash-tagged over the last few years… #EmbraceTheHate because that’s all we can do. Embrace it and feed off it. That’s how to survive the post-season as a Canucks fans.

Take it a step further and like Radim Vrbata:

k6jpu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

@Aviewfromabroad

#TICH: Thomas Gradin 500th Point Milestone

Thomas Gradin is a huge reason I became a Canucks fan. I was six years old and when I saw him skate for the first time on that very rare TV appearance, I knew I was hooked. My family wasn’t all that big into hockey at the time, I  grew up watching a lot more football up to that point. Also, I was six, I just learned to write my name and here I am trying to figure out which hockey team I was going to cheer? It was 1981 and Gradin was the first player to ever possess such a high level of natural skill. He was a far cry from his linemates, Curt Fraser, and much more refined than Stan Smyl, with his hockey gifts. However, that rookie line worked out quite well together.

fred-lee-dec-20-2013

Daniel Sedin (left) and Henrik Sedin (Right) were scouted by Thomas Gradin (centre) and convinced then GM, Brian Burke, to draft the twins second and third in the 1999 NHL entry draft.

Gradin was drafted by the Chicago Blackhawks in 1978 in the 3rd round, 45th overall. He came to play for the Canucks via a trading of his contract rights. Oddly enough, Gradin also was drafted into the WHA by the Winnipeg Jets in the 1st round, 9th overall.  He became one of the first Europeans to join the Canucks organization along with his fellow Swedes, Lars Zetterstrom and Lars Lindgren.  In his rookie year, Gradin scored 20 goals, 31 assists for 51 points. He shared the Cyclone Taylor award for Canucks MVP with goaltender, Glen Hanlon.

 On March 8th, 1985, Thomas Gradin scored his 500th NHL career point, becoming the first Canuck to reach that Milestone. The Canucks defeated the LA Kings that night, 4-3.

No. 23, Thomas Gradin, became the first Canuck to reach the 500 point plateau on March 8, 1985.

No. 23, Thomas Gradin, became the first Canuck to reach the 500 point plateau on March 8, 1985.

Gradin spent eight seasons with the Vancouver Canucks and one with the Boston Bruins before calling it a career in the NHL. He returned to Sweden to play in the SEL for another three years before retiring as a player. In 1994, Gradin came back to the Canucks organization as an amateur scout. Presently he is the Associated Head Scout, a role he has held since 2007.

Notable names Thomas Gradin has helped bring to the Canucks organization:

  • Matthias Ohlund
  • Daniel Sedin
  • Henrik Sedin
  • Alex Edler

On January 24, 2011, Gradin was inducted into the Canucks Ring of Honour. He ended his NHL careeer with 209 goals, 384 assists and 593 points. Fittingly enough, Gradin averaged just above 23 goals/year in his NHL career. Thanks Thomas, for validating my reason to become a Canucks fan way back when. You’ve helped mould that six year old’s sports passion and especially for the Canucks. 

That’s #TICH today, March 8, 1985.

@Aviewfromabroad

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Gradin seen here being inducted into the Canucks Ring of Honour in 2011

#TBT: Nucks Nicknames

What’s in a nickname? For some, it’s just a variation of their given names. For others, it’s a character tell and some just don’t make sense. Remember when David Booth said everyone on the team were given animal nicknames and we were trying to figure out who he called “Whitetail”?  Over the years, there have been some pretty different and/or cool player nicknames, we have heard of and some others have not. Some were given to them by their teammates, some from fans and many of the mainstream ones from local media.

Looking back to revisit some of these monikers and share some insight (if any) given to them.

Garth Butcher was known as “The Strangler”. When he used to fight, he’d grope or grab on to someone almost like he was strangling them instead of punching. Although, Garth Butcher on its own was scary enough. The nickname was just bonus.

Big, bad Garth.

Big, bad Garth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Crawford is known to many of us just as “Crow” when he coached in the NHL. Some of that is credited to his name but I’d be the first to admit, it might have something to do with his voice as well. However, in Crawford’s playing days for the Canucks organization, his nickname was “747” due to the frequency he went back and forth the big club and the minor league affiliate.

A very young Marc Crawford during his Canucks playing days. Photo Credit: HF Boards

A very young Marc Crawford during his Canucks playing days. Photo Credit: HF Boards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Igor Larionov is internationally known to the hockey worlds as, “The Professor”. He was considered one of the smartest players in the game and many of his contemporaries thought of him being ahead of his time. If you’ve never seen Larionov play, I suggest getting on youtube and getting educated.

"In the '80s, he was arguably the best center in the world." -- Wayne Gretzky, about Larionov

“In the ’80s, he was arguably the best center in the world.”
– Wayne Gretzky, about Larionov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Johan Hedberg came to the Canucks as Dan Cloutier’s backup in the early 2000’s. However, it’s a piece of equipment that gave him his nickname “The Moose”. When an up and coming Hedberg was in with Pittsburgh, he played with his AHL Manitoba Moose mask and never changed it. From then on, he’s had the nickname. Come to think of it, he wore that mask design with the Canucks too, even before the Moose became our affiliate in the mid to late 2000’s.

Hedberg with his Manitoba Moose helmet as he played back-up to Dan Cloutier.

Hedberg with his Manitoba Moose helmet mixed in with the Canucks Orca in the front of it as he played back-up to Dan Cloutier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jim Sandlak was known to all Canucks fans as, “The House”.  Sure Sandlak was a big guy at 6’4″ and 225lbs, but he didn’t get that nickname just because of his stature. I think it had something to do with eating a bunch of free hot dogs at the Pacific Coliseum in one sitting.

Sandlak was named the 1985 best player at the World Juniors. A Canucks' 1st round pick and a well earned nickname.

Sandlak was named the 1985 best player at the World Juniors. A Canucks’ 1st round pick and a well earned nickname. Photo Credit: The Province Sports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kirk McLean will forever be known for “The Save” in the first round of the 1994 playoffs against Calgary, but he also has a few nicknames. The ones the fans probably gave him is “Captain Kirk” and caught on like wildfire during that run. His teammates usually called him “Mack” but there have been others ones. One is because of the Scottish Lion on his mask, “The Scot”. I’m with the rest of the fans, I’m all about “Captain Kirk”.

Captain Kirk

Captain Kirk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 It’s not a bad start to be a reoccurring feature on CanucksCorner.com’s Throwback Thursday due to the amount of really good nicknames of Canucks players throughout team history. Got a favourite one? Let us know! We’d love to share it with our fellow Canucks fans. Maybe we can figure out who “Whitetail” is and maybe we can finally get the story on “Harry”.

 

@Aviewfromabroad

#TICH: Team Canada 2002 Gold, Salt Lake City

It was the first time in 50 years the Canadian Olympic team won Gold in hockey. A sport that is synonymous with the nation. It was today, February 24, 2002, Burnaby Joe and the rest of Team Canada could give this nation something to cheer for again in Olympic Men’s hockey.

Striking gold in Salt Lake City, Team Canada wins after 50 years of no hockey Olympic gold. Photo Credit: Hockey Canada

Striking gold in Salt Lake City, Team Canada wins after 50 years of no hockey Olympic gold. Photo Credit: Hockey Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know it’s not necessarily a “Canucks” historical moment but there was a member of the Vancouver Canucks  on the 2002 Gold winning Salt Lake City Team Canada roster. Let’s not forget  the winning coach, our legendary Canucks coach and GM, the late Pat Quinn. 

The late Pat Quinn, coached the 2002 Olympic team to gold. Former Canucks player, coach, GM and President. Photo credit: Toronto Sun

The late Pat Quinn, coached the 2002 Olympic team to gold. Former Canucks player, coach, GM and President. Photo credit: Toronto Sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Jovocop” made the Team Canada roster. Jovanovski was known as a free-wheeling, offensive defence-man. He also didn’t mind giving a few memorable hits here and there.  For Team Canada, Ed Jovanovski, assisted on the first Joe Sakic goal which ended up being the game winner. Team Canada defeated Team USA, 5-2 in Salt Lake City, Utah to win gold again, finally.

Ed "Jovocop" Jovanovski was a member of the 2002 Gold winning Olympic Men's hockey team. At the time he was the Canucks No.1 D-man. Photo credit: PowerLine Athletics

Ed “Jovocop” Jovanovski was a member of the 2002 Gold winning Olympic Men’s hockey team. At the time he was the Canucks No.1 D-man. Photo credit: PowerLine Athletics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s #TICH February 24, 2002.

@Aviewfromabroad

Here is a 10 minute highlight reel, called by Bob Cole on CBC of the game in Salt Lake City.

 

#TBT: Canucks’ 5 Prodigal Sons

There are some guys in the NHL that find certain teams, cities or whatever their ‘homes’. With the recent homecoming of sorts for Geroy Simon with the BC Lions front office, I thought of some Canucks players who have done double duty with Vancouver in their careers. One even came back to the team three times.

5. Bobby Schmautz: Played four seasons with the Canucks (1970-1974) scoring 38 goals one season. Between 1974-1980, Schmautz has played for Boston, Colorado (Rockies) and Edmonton until returning to the Canucks for the 80-81 season scoring 27 goals  and 61 points in 73 games before calling it a career.

Schmautz came back to Vancouver in 1980 before retiring.

Schmautz came back to Vancouver in 1980 before retiring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Nolan Baumgartner: First played for Vancouver in the 2002-2003 season. The Canucks lost him in the Waiver Draft and the re-acquired him a month later. Baumgartner played back and forth for the various Canucks AHL affliates and of course for the Canucks as the 7th defenceman. Baumer loved being in the organization so much he came back for thirds. In the 2009-2010 season, he came to play 12 games towards the end. Nolan is now an assistant coach with the Canucks AHL team, The Utica Comets.

aumer still is a Canuck via being an assistant coach with the AHL Utica Comets. Photo Credit: Vancouver Canucks

Baumer still is a Canuck via being an assistant coach with the AHL Utica Comets. Photo Credit: Vancouver Canucks

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Brad May: May Day first came to the Canucks in the 97/98 season before heading off for the Pheonix Coyotes for a few seasons and making another run with the Canucks from 2003-2007.  Brad May was known to be a tough competitor and didn’t mind dropping the gloves with the biggest and the baddest to be considered one of the best middleweight fighters during his time in the NHL. May Day is now a broadcaster/analyst for Rogers Sportsnet.

May Day came back twice. Once wearing No. 9 and the other wearing the now retired No.10. Photo credit: Windsorstar.com

May Day came back twice. Once wearing No. 9 and the other wearing the now retired No.10. Photo credit: Windsorstar.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Harold Snepsts:  Snepts is probably one of Vancouver’s all time favourites. Played for the Canucks from 1974-1984. He then spent some time  with the North Stars and then the Detroit Red Wings organizations. He came back to the Canucks in 1988 and was traded to the St. Louis Blues in 1990 before calling it a career. Many of us won’t ever forget the “HAAAARRRROOOOLLLLDDDD!!!” chants throughout the old Pacific Coliseum. He is also an inductee of the Canucks Ring of Honour at Rogers Arena and debated, along with Dave Babych, to have the best ‘stache ever to be worn by a Canucks player

Snepsts in his hey-day rocking the no helmet and one of the best staches in Canucks history.

Snepsts in his hey-day rocking the no helmet and one of the best staches in Canucks history. Photo credit: Legendsofhockey.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Trevor Linden: Last and definitely not least is No. 16. The guy many did not want traded away in the first place. He is probably this city’s favourite son, transplanted or not, he became one of  “us” during his tenure as a player here with the Vancouver Canucks. Drafted in 1988, he became Vancouver’s new Canucks darling from the get-go. Runner up for the Calder trophy to Brian Leetch and of course, 1994 and his performance in Game 7 vs the Rangers in the Stanley Cup Finals. Mike Keenan traded him in the most unpopular trade of all time on February 6, 1998 with the New York Islanders .However, Linden garnered Betuzzi, McCabe and a 3rd round pick that became Jarkko Ruutu. Brian Burke brought back Canucks’ favourite son in November 2001 for a 1st round and 3rd round pick. Trevor was home and still is home. He is now the President of the Vancouver Canucks and his jersey number is forever retired up in the rafters of Rogers Arena.

At his retirement ceremony, Trevor Linden is forever a Canuck. Photo credit: nhlsnipers.com

At his retirement ceremony, Trevor Linden is forever a Canuck. Photo credit: nhlsnipers.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are my favourite Canucks to do a second tour with the team, but there were quite a few who came out this way more than once. Any one I missed that you would have liked included? I think it’s a pretty good list on this #ThrowbackThursday.

@Aviewfromabroad