#TBT: Nucks Nicknames

What’s in a nickname? For some, it’s just a variation of their given names. For others, it’s a character tell and some just don’t make sense. Remember when David Booth said everyone on the team were given animal nicknames and we were trying to figure out who he called “Whitetail”?  Over the years, there have been some pretty different and/or cool player nicknames, we have heard of and some others have not. Some were given to them by their teammates, some from fans and many of the mainstream ones from local media.

Looking back to revisit some of these monikers and share some insight (if any) given to them.

Garth Butcher was known as “The Strangler”. When he used to fight, he’d grope or grab on to someone almost like he was strangling them instead of punching. Although, Garth Butcher on its own was scary enough. The nickname was just bonus.

Big, bad Garth.

Big, bad Garth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Crawford is known to many of us just as “Crow” when he coached in the NHL. Some of that is credited to his name but I’d be the first to admit, it might have something to do with his voice as well. However, in Crawford’s playing days for the Canucks organization, his nickname was “747” due to the frequency he went back and forth the big club and the minor league affiliate.

A very young Marc Crawford during his Canucks playing days. Photo Credit: HF Boards

A very young Marc Crawford during his Canucks playing days. Photo Credit: HF Boards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Igor Larionov is internationally known to the hockey worlds as, “The Professor”. He was considered one of the smartest players in the game and many of his contemporaries thought of him being ahead of his time. If you’ve never seen Larionov play, I suggest getting on youtube and getting educated.

"In the '80s, he was arguably the best center in the world." -- Wayne Gretzky, about Larionov

“In the ’80s, he was arguably the best center in the world.”
– Wayne Gretzky, about Larionov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Johan Hedberg came to the Canucks as Dan Cloutier’s backup in the early 2000’s. However, it’s a piece of equipment that gave him his nickname “The Moose”. When an up and coming Hedberg was in with Pittsburgh, he played with his AHL Manitoba Moose mask and never changed it. From then on, he’s had the nickname. Come to think of it, he wore that mask design with the Canucks too, even before the Moose became our affiliate in the mid to late 2000’s.

Hedberg with his Manitoba Moose helmet as he played back-up to Dan Cloutier.

Hedberg with his Manitoba Moose helmet mixed in with the Canucks Orca in the front of it as he played back-up to Dan Cloutier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jim Sandlak was known to all Canucks fans as, “The House”.  Sure Sandlak was a big guy at 6’4″ and 225lbs, but he didn’t get that nickname just because of his stature. I think it had something to do with eating a bunch of free hot dogs at the Pacific Coliseum in one sitting.

Sandlak was named the 1985 best player at the World Juniors. A Canucks' 1st round pick and a well earned nickname.

Sandlak was named the 1985 best player at the World Juniors. A Canucks’ 1st round pick and a well earned nickname. Photo Credit: The Province Sports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kirk McLean will forever be known for “The Save” in the first round of the 1994 playoffs against Calgary, but he also has a few nicknames. The ones the fans probably gave him is “Captain Kirk” and caught on like wildfire during that run. His teammates usually called him “Mack” but there have been others ones. One is because of the Scottish Lion on his mask, “The Scot”. I’m with the rest of the fans, I’m all about “Captain Kirk”.

Captain Kirk

Captain Kirk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 It’s not a bad start to be a reoccurring feature on CanucksCorner.com’s Throwback Thursday due to the amount of really good nicknames of Canucks players throughout team history. Got a favourite one? Let us know! We’d love to share it with our fellow Canucks fans. Maybe we can figure out who “Whitetail” is and maybe we can finally get the story on “Harry”.

 

@Aviewfromabroad

#TICH: Team Canada 2002 Gold, Salt Lake City

It was the first time in 50 years the Canadian Olympic team won Gold in hockey. A sport that is synonymous with the nation. It was today, February 24, 2002, Burnaby Joe and the rest of Team Canada could give this nation something to cheer for again in Olympic Men’s hockey.

Striking gold in Salt Lake City, Team Canada wins after 50 years of no hockey Olympic gold. Photo Credit: Hockey Canada

Striking gold in Salt Lake City, Team Canada wins after 50 years of no hockey Olympic gold. Photo Credit: Hockey Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know it’s not necessarily a “Canucks” historical moment but there was a member of the Vancouver Canucks  on the 2002 Gold winning Salt Lake City Team Canada roster. Let’s not forget  the winning coach, our legendary Canucks coach and GM, the late Pat Quinn. 

The late Pat Quinn, coached the 2002 Olympic team to gold. Former Canucks player, coach, GM and President. Photo credit: Toronto Sun

The late Pat Quinn, coached the 2002 Olympic team to gold. Former Canucks player, coach, GM and President. Photo credit: Toronto Sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Jovocop” made the Team Canada roster. Jovanovski was known as a free-wheeling, offensive defence-man. He also didn’t mind giving a few memorable hits here and there.  For Team Canada, Ed Jovanovski, assisted on the first Joe Sakic goal which ended up being the game winner. Team Canada defeated Team USA, 5-2 in Salt Lake City, Utah to win gold again, finally.

Ed "Jovocop" Jovanovski was a member of the 2002 Gold winning Olympic Men's hockey team. At the time he was the Canucks No.1 D-man. Photo credit: PowerLine Athletics

Ed “Jovocop” Jovanovski was a member of the 2002 Gold winning Olympic Men’s hockey team. At the time he was the Canucks No.1 D-man. Photo credit: PowerLine Athletics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s #TICH February 24, 2002.

@Aviewfromabroad

Here is a 10 minute highlight reel, called by Bob Cole on CBC of the game in Salt Lake City.

 

#TBT: Canucks’ 5 Prodigal Sons

There are some guys in the NHL that find certain teams, cities or whatever their ‘homes’. With the recent homecoming of sorts for Geroy Simon with the BC Lions front office, I thought of some Canucks players who have done double duty with Vancouver in their careers. One even came back to the team three times.

5. Bobby Schmautz: Played four seasons with the Canucks (1970-1974) scoring 38 goals one season. Between 1974-1980, Schmautz has played for Boston, Colorado (Rockies) and Edmonton until returning to the Canucks for the 80-81 season scoring 27 goals  and 61 points in 73 games before calling it a career.

Schmautz came back to Vancouver in 1980 before retiring.

Schmautz came back to Vancouver in 1980 before retiring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Nolan Baumgartner: First played for Vancouver in the 2002-2003 season. The Canucks lost him in the Waiver Draft and the re-acquired him a month later. Baumgartner played back and forth for the various Canucks AHL affliates and of course for the Canucks as the 7th defenceman. Baumer loved being in the organization so much he came back for thirds. In the 2009-2010 season, he came to play 12 games towards the end. Nolan is now an assistant coach with the Canucks AHL team, The Utica Comets.

aumer still is a Canuck via being an assistant coach with the AHL Utica Comets. Photo Credit: Vancouver Canucks

Baumer still is a Canuck via being an assistant coach with the AHL Utica Comets. Photo Credit: Vancouver Canucks

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Brad May: May Day first came to the Canucks in the 97/98 season before heading off for the Pheonix Coyotes for a few seasons and making another run with the Canucks from 2003-2007.  Brad May was known to be a tough competitor and didn’t mind dropping the gloves with the biggest and the baddest to be considered one of the best middleweight fighters during his time in the NHL. May Day is now a broadcaster/analyst for Rogers Sportsnet.

May Day came back twice. Once wearing No. 9 and the other wearing the now retired No.10. Photo credit: Windsorstar.com

May Day came back twice. Once wearing No. 9 and the other wearing the now retired No.10. Photo credit: Windsorstar.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Harold Snepsts:  Snepts is probably one of Vancouver’s all time favourites. Played for the Canucks from 1974-1984. He then spent some time  with the North Stars and then the Detroit Red Wings organizations. He came back to the Canucks in 1988 and was traded to the St. Louis Blues in 1990 before calling it a career. Many of us won’t ever forget the “HAAAARRRROOOOLLLLDDDD!!!” chants throughout the old Pacific Coliseum. He is also an inductee of the Canucks Ring of Honour at Rogers Arena and debated, along with Dave Babych, to have the best ‘stache ever to be worn by a Canucks player

Snepsts in his hey-day rocking the no helmet and one of the best staches in Canucks history.

Snepsts in his hey-day rocking the no helmet and one of the best staches in Canucks history. Photo credit: Legendsofhockey.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Trevor Linden: Last and definitely not least is No. 16. The guy many did not want traded away in the first place. He is probably this city’s favourite son, transplanted or not, he became one of  “us” during his tenure as a player here with the Vancouver Canucks. Drafted in 1988, he became Vancouver’s new Canucks darling from the get-go. Runner up for the Calder trophy to Brian Leetch and of course, 1994 and his performance in Game 7 vs the Rangers in the Stanley Cup Finals. Mike Keenan traded him in the most unpopular trade of all time on February 6, 1998 with the New York Islanders .However, Linden garnered Betuzzi, McCabe and a 3rd round pick that became Jarkko Ruutu. Brian Burke brought back Canucks’ favourite son in November 2001 for a 1st round and 3rd round pick. Trevor was home and still is home. He is now the President of the Vancouver Canucks and his jersey number is forever retired up in the rafters of Rogers Arena.

At his retirement ceremony, Trevor Linden is forever a Canuck. Photo credit: nhlsnipers.com

At his retirement ceremony, Trevor Linden is forever a Canuck. Photo credit: nhlsnipers.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are my favourite Canucks to do a second tour with the team, but there were quite a few who came out this way more than once. Any one I missed that you would have liked included? I think it’s a pretty good list on this #ThrowbackThursday.

@Aviewfromabroad

#TICH: The Infamous Third Jersey in Salmon

January 27, 1996, The Vancouver Canucks introduced the infamous “Salmon Jerseys” as their third jersey. It debuted at then called, General Motors Place, to mixed reviews. Some really liked them and some considered them one of the most hideous jersey the team has put out since their “Flying V” one.

Captain Trevor Linden, still fresh faced sports the Salmon Jersey today in 1996.

Captain Trevor Linden, still fresh faced sports the Salmon Jersey today in 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It definitely wasn’t one of my favourites but I do find it amusing that Canucks fans to this day still talk about it. It’s even more amazing the every now and then you will see one or two of these on a rack at sports retailers all around Metro Vancouver. Admittedly, I almost bought myself one of these back in the day…

I was a huge fan of Alexander Mogilny, too bad he couldn't play every year like it was a contract year.

I was a huge fan of Alexander Mogilny, too bad he couldn’t play every year like it was a contract year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So Today in Canucks’ History, the “Salmon Jerseys” were shown for the first time. Luckily, in my personal opinion, we never have to see them ever again.

 

@Aviewfromabroad

 

PS, here is a rare picture of Markus Naslund wearing No.22, and most fortunate for this #TICH, it’s in this third jersey of the Canucks.

Number 19 first wore 22 when he became a Canuck. Here is one in this infamous third jersey.

Number 19 first wore 22 when he became a Canuck. Here is one in this infamous third jersey.

#TBT Hockey Hair: Who Rocked What?

When most people think of “hockey hair”, the vision of the mullet comes up, because in the late 80s and early 90s, it was so. When I used to describe guys back then, I would use the term “hockey hair” guys  back then… “He’s tall, blonde, has hockey hair…”. Yeah, it was a thing.  However, not all “hockey hair” is that of business in the front and party in the back. In fact, we have some other categories to show you.

Classic Hockey Hair: The Mullet

Here are some guys that have rocked the mullet their way. Some make me want to cringe, but they all make me laugh.

Kenny Baumgartner rocked the mullet like he was Billy Ray Cyrus.

Kenny Baumgartner rocked the mullet like he was Billy Ray Cyrus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If John Stamos didn't use hairspray, I venture to say his hair looked a lot a like Jagr's famous 'signature' do.

If John Stamos didn’t use hairspray, I venture to say his hair looked a lot a like Jagr’s famous ‘signature’ do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perhaps, Al Iafrate wore it until his last hair follicle fell out.

Perhaps, Al Iafrate wore it until his last hair follicle fell out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The coaches got into it too. Barry Melrose sported his mullet with his Armani suits.

The coaches got into it too. Barry Melrose sported his mullet with his Armani suits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The infamous hockey hair better known as the mullet. Who else rocked a pretty good one? Well I’d have to go back to 2010…

Tanner Glass rocked a mullet during his time with the Canucks, although a much more modern version of it, but still a enough party in the back to make the category.

Tanner Glass rocked a mullet during his time with the Canucks, although a much more modern version of it, but still a enough party in the back to make the category.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bald and the Beautiful?

My nickname for Alex Auld when he was playing for the Canucks was "Auldy the Baldy". Still, hair or no hair, you can't hide handsome.

My nickname for Alex Auld when he was playing for the Canucks was “Auldy the Baldy”. Still, hair or no hair, you can’t hide handsome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He rocked the bald look so well, he even got a blog named after him, Jan Bulis.

He rocked the bald look so well, he even got a blog named after him, Jan Bulis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The more Mats Sundin lost his hair, the more viking he became on the ice. The opposite of Samson, Sundin rocked that looked like a champ.

The more Mats Sundin lost his hair, the more viking he became on the ice. The opposite of Samson, Sundin rocked that look like a champ.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For some reason I want to play pool…

 

Greased Lightning!

Now there is greased…

 

roberto-luongo-canada

Roberto Luongo actually looks better with the slicked back look. It suits him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and there is greasy…

No matter what length of hair he had, Brent Sopel never had it look clean.

No matter what length of hair he had, Brent Sopel never had it look clean.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or this…

Mirror, Mirror, on the wall, who has the greasiest hair of all? Why you do, Mike Ricci!

Mirror, Mirror, on the wall, who has the greasiest hair of all? Why you do, Mike Ricci!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Got Flow: Here are the guys that keep the hair product companies in business.

Kris Letang makes the 90's one length Seattle grunge hair look good. I wonder what conditioner he uses.

Kris Letang makes the 90’s one length Seattle grunge hair look good. I wonder what conditioner he uses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan Kesler rocked the best Astro Boy hair ever circa 2009.

Ryan Kesler rocked the best Astro Boy hair ever circa 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vintage Jose Theodore had model looks and the locks to go with it.

Vintage Jose Theodore had model looks and the locks to go with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These guys could basically have any hair style and they could make it look good!

Quit Clowning Around!

Ronald McDonald was apparently a hair trend setter for the NHL as well…

Trend Setter! Red Hair, don't care!

Trend Setter! Red Hair, don’t care!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You should have the get out of bed clown hair…

Mike Commodore was rocking some ginger fro look during his time with the Carolina Hurricanes for a few seasons.

Mike Commodore was rocking some ginger fro look during his time with the Carolina Hurricanes for a few seasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of the perfectly coiffed

Daniel Alfredsson was trying to rock a more coiffed clown look.

Daniel Alfredsson was trying to rock a more coiffed clown look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is a look at some of the hockey hair of yester-years (and some present). It just goes to show you not all hockey hair is a mullet, but it sure sparked some interesting hairstyles over the years on the ice. Which was your favourite player or hockey figure to every rock a memorable hairstyle? Mine? It belongs to one in stripes… “Hair” himself, Kerry Fraser

 

There was no one more proud of his hair that ever around NHL ice than Kerry Fraser. His nickname says it all... "Hair"

There was no one more proud of his hair that ever around NHL ice than Kerry Fraser. His nickname says it all… “Hair”