#TBT Hockey Hair: Who Rocked What?

When most people think of “hockey hair”, the vision of the mullet comes up, because in the late 80s and early 90s, it was so. When I used to describe guys back then, I would use the term “hockey hair” guys  back then… “He’s tall, blonde, has hockey hair…”. Yeah, it was a thing.  However, not all “hockey hair” is that of business in the front and party in the back. In fact, we have some other categories to show you.

Classic Hockey Hair: The Mullet

Here are some guys that have rocked the mullet their way. Some make me want to cringe, but they all make me laugh.

Kenny Baumgartner rocked the mullet like he was Billy Ray Cyrus.

Kenny Baumgartner rocked the mullet like he was Billy Ray Cyrus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If John Stamos didn't use hairspray, I venture to say his hair looked a lot a like Jagr's famous 'signature' do.

If John Stamos didn’t use hairspray, I venture to say his hair looked a lot a like Jagr’s famous ‘signature’ do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perhaps, Al Iafrate wore it until his last hair follicle fell out.

Perhaps, Al Iafrate wore it until his last hair follicle fell out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The coaches got into it too. Barry Melrose sported his mullet with his Armani suits.

The coaches got into it too. Barry Melrose sported his mullet with his Armani suits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The infamous hockey hair better known as the mullet. Who else rocked a pretty good one? Well I’d have to go back to 2010…

Tanner Glass rocked a mullet during his time with the Canucks, although a much more modern version of it, but still a enough party in the back to make the category.

Tanner Glass rocked a mullet during his time with the Canucks, although a much more modern version of it, but still a enough party in the back to make the category.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bald and the Beautiful?

My nickname for Alex Auld when he was playing for the Canucks was "Auldy the Baldy". Still, hair or no hair, you can't hide handsome.

My nickname for Alex Auld when he was playing for the Canucks was “Auldy the Baldy”. Still, hair or no hair, you can’t hide handsome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He rocked the bald look so well, he even got a blog named after him, Jan Bulis.

He rocked the bald look so well, he even got a blog named after him, Jan Bulis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The more Mats Sundin lost his hair, the more viking he became on the ice. The opposite of Samson, Sundin rocked that looked like a champ.

The more Mats Sundin lost his hair, the more viking he became on the ice. The opposite of Samson, Sundin rocked that look like a champ.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For some reason I want to play pool…

 

Greased Lightning!

Now there is greased…

 

roberto-luongo-canada

Roberto Luongo actually looks better with the slicked back look. It suits him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and there is greasy…

No matter what length of hair he had, Brent Sopel never had it look clean.

No matter what length of hair he had, Brent Sopel never had it look clean.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or this…

Mirror, Mirror, on the wall, who has the greasiest hair of all? Why you do, Mike Ricci!

Mirror, Mirror, on the wall, who has the greasiest hair of all? Why you do, Mike Ricci!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Got Flow: Here are the guys that keep the hair product companies in business.

Kris Letang makes the 90's one length Seattle grunge hair look good. I wonder what conditioner he uses.

Kris Letang makes the 90’s one length Seattle grunge hair look good. I wonder what conditioner he uses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan Kesler rocked the best Astro Boy hair ever circa 2009.

Ryan Kesler rocked the best Astro Boy hair ever circa 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vintage Jose Theodore had model looks and the locks to go with it.

Vintage Jose Theodore had model looks and the locks to go with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These guys could basically have any hair style and they could make it look good!

Quit Clowning Around!

Ronald McDonald was apparently a hair trend setter for the NHL as well…

Trend Setter! Red Hair, don't care!

Trend Setter! Red Hair, don’t care!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You should have the get out of bed clown hair…

Mike Commodore was rocking some ginger fro look during his time with the Carolina Hurricanes for a few seasons.

Mike Commodore was rocking some ginger fro look during his time with the Carolina Hurricanes for a few seasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of the perfectly coiffed

Daniel Alfredsson was trying to rock a more coiffed clown look.

Daniel Alfredsson was trying to rock a more coiffed clown look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is a look at some of the hockey hair of yester-years (and some present). It just goes to show you not all hockey hair is a mullet, but it sure sparked some interesting hairstyles over the years on the ice. Which was your favourite player or hockey figure to every rock a memorable hairstyle? Mine? It belongs to one in stripes… “Hair” himself, Kerry Fraser

 

There was no one more proud of his hair that ever around NHL ice than Kerry Fraser. His nickname says it all... "Hair"

There was no one more proud of his hair that ever around NHL ice than Kerry Fraser. His nickname says it all… “Hair”

#TBT: Daft Drafting- Worst 1st Round Misses

It’s not a secret the Vancouver Canucks have not had the best luck, insight and/or intuition regarding their first round draft picks over the years. There have been some very notable mis-picks and for whatever reason, the Canucks haven’t really learned from their past mistakes and continue to miss the mark more often than not.

Here’s a look at some of the bigger mis-picks the Canucks have made with that 1st round pick. Listed after each pick are players  the Canucks could have had after their draft pick was made.

(AS) – All-Star (HOF) Hall of Fame

1973 Dennis Ververgaert

1973 3rd Overall pick.

1973 3rd Overall pick.

Ververgaert played with the London Knights of the OHL,  scoring 147 points in 1972–73, including a franchise record 89 assists (Sergei Kostitsyn later broke that record) and was selected 3rd overall in the 1973 NHL Amateur Draft by the Vancouver Canucks. He was big and skilled and many thought he had the potential to be a big name player in the NHL. He played six seasons with the Vancouver Canucks before moving on to Flyers and the Capitals. He had a decent career but not the one the Canucks were hoping for when they drafted him. 

Notable available picks: Lanny McDonald (HOF), Bob Gainey(HOF)

1977 Jere Gillis 

1977 1st Round pick for the Canucks, Jere Gillis.

1977 1st Round pick for the Canucks, Jere Gillis.

Drafted 4th overall in 1977 by the Canucks, Jere Gillis did not pan out as much as the team would have liked. In  386  games, Jere Gillis scored 78 goals, 95 assists totaling 173 points. He had a 10 year NHL career with some stints in the minors in between a few of those years. Gillis played for the Canucks, Rangers, Flyers, Sabres and the Nordiques organizations.

Notable available picks: Ron Duguay (AS), Mike Bossy (HOF)

1979 Rick Vaive

1979 1st round pick, Rick Vaive

1979 1st round pick, Rick Vaive

Chosen 4th overall in the 1979 NHL Entry draft, Rick Vaive was not at all a bad choice when looking at his career numbers (GP 876  G441 A 347 ) except the majority of those numbers were put up playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs, including being the first 50 goal scorer in Maple Leaf franchise history. He was traded along with Bill Derlago for Dave “Tiger” Williams and Jerry Butler in a lop-sided trade in favour of the Maple Leafs, but that’s another #TBT subject.

Notable available picks: Raymond Bourque (HOF), Michel Goulet (HOF)

1981 Garth Butcher

Garth Butcher, 1981 1st round pick.

Garth Butcher, 1981 1st round pick.

Chosen 10th overall in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft, Garth Butcher became a Canucks fan favourite and was also known for selling Trevor Linden a classic 60’s Mustang during Linden’s rookie year. He became an integral part of the “Blues Brothers” trade in the 1990’s that brought a group of players to put the Canucks into a playoff position. Butcher did well for someone who was more of a shut down 3rd line guy, but the Canucks could have had a HOF defenseman with a wicked shot.

Notable available picks: Al McInnes (HOF)

1986 Dan Woodley

1986 1st round pick, Dan Woodley Photo credit: Ottawa Citizen

1986 1st round pick, Dan Woodley Photo credit: Ottawa Citizen

Dan Woodley was the 7th overall pick in the 1986 NHL Entry Draft from the Portland Winterhawks. With the Winterhawks, Woodley posted a 108 pt season and an 100 pt season, so the appeal was strong with the Canucks to draft him. Playing only five NHL with the Canucks, he spent the rest of his career in the minors between the AHL and the former IHL. In picking Woodley, another HOF defenseman was left for the Rangers to grab.

Notable available picks: Brian Leetch (HOF)

1990 Petr Nedved

2nd overall pick in the 1990 NHL Entry Draft.

2nd overall pick in the 1990 NHL Entry Draft.

 Nedved had a decent career in the NHL,  but not the player many predicted him to be when he defected to Canada. Due to limited opportunities in communist Czechloslovakia to play, Nedved ended up in the WHL with the Seattle Thunderbirds. There he scored 145 points in 71 games. Nedved played three years with the Vancouver Canucks with a 38 goal 31 assist season in 92/93.  Due to a bitter contract dispute with the Canucks and he held out. Nedved went to play for the St. Louis Blues,  in a trade, for Craig Janney. However the Canucks could have had fellow Czech and future HOF and a reputation to be tough as nails instead of Nedved.

Shawn Antoski

18th Overall pick in the 1990 NHL Entry Draft

18th Overall pick in the 1990 NHL Entry Draft

So in 1990, the Canucks had not one but two picks in the 1st round and they missed on both of them. For their 18th overall pick, Pat Quinn went with Shawn Antoski. A rough and tough checker that wasn’t afraid to drop the gloves. Quinn had a reputation for liking these types of players and Antoski wasn’t an exception. In his NHL career, Antoski played 183 games, scored 3 goals, 5 assists giving him a total of 8 points. He has played for the Canucks, Flyers, Penguins and the Ducks.  Even with Jagr gone out of the pick pool, an American All-star level forward who scored more than 500 NHL goals and probably the best goalie of all time who solidified his spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame was still up for grabs, but instead, Quinn went with Antoski.

Notable available picks: Jaromir Jagr (AS) before Antoski- after Antoski – Keith Tkachuk(AS) , Martin Brodeur (AS)

1991 Alek Stojanov 

1991 Alek Stojanov was the Canucks 1st round pick.

1991 Alek Stojanov was the Canucks 1st round pick.

In true Pat Quinn fashion, with the 7th overall pick in 1991, Alek Stojanov was chosen. The Windsor, ON native played his junior hockey in the OHL. He put up decent numbers and had no problems dropping the gloves. Although, his transition into the NHL did not go as planned. He ended up only playing 107 games, scoring 2 goals and 5 assists in his NHL career. However, Stojanov proved to be the bait to eventually catch the big fish in 1995. He was traded to Pittsburgh for Markus Naslund. Later on, Naslund ended being the future Captain of the Vancouver Canucks and became an All-Star in the NHL. Stojanov played a few more years in the minors after the trade and eventually retired to become a firefighter in Pennsylvania.

Notable available picks: Markus Naslund (AS), Alexei Kovalev (AS)

1997 Brad Ferrence

Brad Ference was the 1997 1st Round pick for the Canucks.

Brad Ference was the 1997 1st Round pick for the Canucks.

The 10th overall pick in the 1997 NHL Entry Draft is Brad Ference. He didn’t even play one game for the Vancouver Canucks because he was traded to the Florida Panthers with Pavel Bure and Bret Hedican in January 1999. The Canucks received Dave Gagner, Ed Jovanovski, Mike Brown and Kevin Weekes in return. 250 games and 34 points later, it was a good trade. Ference was more known for dating US Olympic figure skater, Michelle Kwan than what he did on the NHL ice. Although, the Canucks could have gotten a sniper and cup chaser instead.

Notable available picks: Marian Hossa (AS)

2006 Michael Grabner 

Austria's Michael Grabner was the 2006 1st round pick for the Canucks.

Austria’s Michael Grabner was the 2006 1st round pick for the Canucks.

The 14th overall pick of the 2006 NHL Entry Draft is far from a bust in his career, but Grabner wasn’t a Canuck for very long. Don’t get me wrong, Grabner is a hell of a player and his story is not yet fully told in the NHL. Traded to the Florida Panthers with Steve Bernier for Keith Ballard and Victor Oreskovich. The Panthers waived this gem and was picked up by the Islanders and so far having a nice go at the NHL on Long Island. But, how good would have this guy looked in a Canucks uniform…

 

Notable avaiable picks: Claude Giroux

2007 Patrick White

Canucks' 25th overall pick in the 2007, Patrick White.

Canucks’ 25th overall pick in the 2007, Patrick White.

In 2007, the Canucks chose Patrick White 25th overall in the NHL Entry Draft. Some of you are probably wondering who is he? Well, I am sitting here thinking about it and you’re all right, who is he? With a draft that boasted Patrick Kane and Logan Couture, anything beyond the top 10 picks was pretty much a crap shoot, and well, the Canucks crapped out. White is playing out in Slovakia and did play for a KHL team and really hasn’t been heard from since in North American hockey. The only player that would have appealed to me in that draft class wasn’t even in the 1st round after White but the 2nd round and  he became a Norris Trophy winner in 2013.

Notable available picks: PK Subban (2nd round)

 

Hindsight is definitely 20/20 and foresight isn’t always as clear as we thought it would be at the time. It seems to be an ongoing problem for the Canucks drafting team. However, we have seem some gems over the years and didn’t lose all our first rounds by a country mile. These were just some to remind us of  “Picks of Drafts Past” on this #ThrowbackThursday. 

Follow me on twitter @Aviewfromabroad

       

Today In Canucks History: Stan Smyl

This the first edition of “Today in Canucks History” or simply hashtagged #TICH. From time to time we will sharing moments of happenings from that day. Hope you enjoy it and we look forward to sharing more of these moments with you throughout the season.

On November 3, 1991 Stan Smyl’s No. 12 was retired and went up into the rafters at Pacific Coliseum.  That night, the Vancouver Canucks won 7-2 over the Edmonton Oilers. Smyl is the only one of the four Canucks  number retirements that was retired at the old “Rink on Renfrew”. All the others have been at GM Place/Rogers Arena. He is also the only one out of the four retired numbers that played his whole career with the Vancouver Canucks, from 1978 to 1991.

Stan Smyl's No.12 was retired on Nov.3, 1991 at the old Pacific Coliseum.

Stan Smyl’s No.12 was retired on Nov.3, 1991 at the old Pacific Coliseum.

Smyl served as Captain from 1982 until his retirement.
GP 899- G 262-  A 411-  Pts 673

Stan now works for the Vancouver Canucks as Senior Advisor to GM & Director of Player Development.

Thanks Steamer.

Thanks Steamer! You are forever a Canuck.

Thanks Steamer! You are forever a Canuck.

Justine Galo

Follow me on twitter: @Aviewfromabroad

Interview: CBC’s Shane Foxman and Karin Larsen sit down to talk about the return of Seeking Stanley.

During last season’s grueling run to the Stanley Cup Finals a new post game show was born at CBC Vancouver called Seeking Stanley. The show, featuring hosts Shane Foxman and Karin Larsen, returns for another playoff run and will begin this Saturday, March 3rd following Hockey Night in Canada’s After Hours. The original airings will be a half hour show running from 10:30 to 11:00pm and promises to give Canucks fans extra coverage of things they normally don’t see on the highlights each evening.

We had chance to chat to Shane and Karin about the show, the social media components to it and what fans can expect from this year’s show.

CanucksCorner.com: Like the Canucks, Seeking Stanley on CBC had a long run in last year’s playoffs. This year you are starting things a little earlier, so what can we expect for this year’s season of the program and why the earlier start this year?

KL: The earlier start is due to a perfect storm of scheduling of the Canucks on Hockey Night in Canada. Seeking Stanley has always piggy backed off “the big show”, using the resources (cameras, video feeds, personnel) that Hockey Night has in place. Plus after an eight and a half month absence, it made sense to get the show out there early to remind people.

Seeking Stanley’s primary objective is to provide bonus Canucks TV coverage, take the viewer behind the scenes, in the dressing room, coaches presser etc. Whereas Hockey Night is a national show that covers the games from a much broader perspective – we only care about the Canucks and our aim is to bring that local story to the BC fans.

CanucksCorner.com: I think it’s safe to say that most fans were exhausted by the end of the finals last year. Can the same be said for the media, who may not be as emotionally invested, but certainly face hectic schedules as part of their job?

SF: Absolutely. By the time we got to the Stanley Cup Final we were exhausted. It wasn’t the 14 hour days, it was the travel. Leave the rink in Boston at 1 am… you need to unwind…flight for Vancouver leaves at 6 am (You have to get up at 4). Not complaining though, it was an unbelievable experience.

CanucksCorner.com: Have you ever thought of having a social media component on the show? Perhaps have some local bloggers and Twitter personalities participate in a social media roundtable with the hosts?

KL: We hadn’t thought of that specific application of social media in the show. We will have a social media twitter component in the show this year. It’s still being worked out and will probably evolve as the show progresses.

CanucksCorner.com: Sticking with social media for a bit, have you considered holding a live “Tweetup” taping for Seeking Stanley or perhaps something like a town forum environment?

KL: A tweetup may be in our future. One of the reasons we hosted a media and blogger launch on Wednesday is because we recognize the importance of social media to engage and interact with our audience. Social media, particularly Twitter, is flooded with Canucks posts all the time and when there’s a game, the Canucks and hockey related keywords are consistently trending. It’s what people are talking about. We want to make sure we are a big part of that online experience.

CanucksCorner.com: Will the show be active during games and post game on Twitter and Facebook? Fans should follow the hashtag #SeekingStanley, correct?

SF: Yes, as far as the Hashtag goes we’ll be using #seekingstanley, and yes, we will be active on twitter during the games and during Seeking Stanley. We want to be as interactive as we can.

CanucksCorner.com: Last season, Cliff Ronning was a guest on Seeking Stanley. Will he be back or will you incorporate more Canucks alumni this season?

SF: Cliff Ronning will be back. Not only can Cliff tell us what it is like “in the room”, he also was part of the Canucks’ magical 1994 run. He knows what it’s like to play in game 7 of the Stanley Cup final. That perspective is invaluable.

CanucksCorner.com: What makes Seeking Stanley different from other Canucks focused shows?

SF: Access. Because the games are broadcast on Hockey Night in Canada, it gives us a great opportunity to take viewers were they seldom get to go. In the locker room, but not just for a 10 second sound bite of a player… we will let the viewers see and hear the entire conversation between reporters and players… we run the coaches’ post game news conferences in their entirety, so viewers feel like they are in the room.

CanucksCorner.com: Finally, a prediction: Will the Canucks finally find Stanley, after seeking for all these years?

KL: As a born and raised Vancouverite, dear god I hope so.

SF: If not this year, when?

Our thanks to Karin Larsen and Shane Foxman for chatting with us about Seeking Stanley.

When: Following every Canucks Saturday HNIC broadcast and Canucks playoff games, starting March 3rd at 10:30pm

Where: CBC, CBCHD in BC.

Website: http://www.cbc.ca/bc/features/seeking-stanley/#igImgId_27450

Twitter Hashtag: #SeekingStanley Follow: @CBCVancouver

Bruce Ng: Canucks “Wagon Watch” after a 4-3 loss in Anaheim.

Luongo's wagon isn't this lonely. Yet.

Throughout the season, the Canucks Wagonwatch series will track how much room is on the team’s bandwagon. In addition, it will also track the completely separate Luongo wagon.

Tonight the Canucks lost a tough one 4-3 against the Ducks in Anaheim. Down 4-0 to start the 3rd period, the boys staged a nice comeback effort that ultimately fell short by a goal.

Canucks Bandwagon: 70% Full

The Canucks played the night before in Los Angeles, and picked up a 3-2 win. Last night they built a 3-0 lead after one period, and coasted to the 3-2 final. Tonight, they slow-played the first period, and melted down in the 2nd, allowing 4 goals. To their credit (and my surprise!), the Canucks came roaring back in the 3rd, scoring 3 goals of their own, earning a power play chance late in the game, but still lost by a goal. It was an entertaining finish and gave the fans something to cheer for – at least for the fans that hadn’t shut off their TV by then.

Luongo Bandwagon: 30% Full

Luongo didn’t necessarily play a horrible game, but allowed 4 goals on 19 shots. All 4 goals came in the 2nd period, and Luongo did not return for the 3rd. There is an old hockey adage that says the goaltender needs to be your best penalty killer; unfortunately that wasn’t the case tonight. Luongo’s wagon might have even less people, but Schneider only had to make 2 saves in the entire 3rd period as the Canucks spent the entire period pouring on the offensive pressure. The Luongo Bandwagon exodus was also tempered by the fact that he picked up a pretty good win the night before.

#Rome4Norris Campaign Suffers Setback

Aaron Rome had made some mistakes earlier in the game, but the team was able to get out of the 1st period still in a scoreless tie. Rome took a 5-minute major for elbowing, which came with a game misconduct in the 2nd period. The Ducks scored twice on the ensuing power play, and the Canucks were forced to play the rest of the game with 5 defencemen. If Rome isn’t Shanabanned by the league for that elbow, he’ll have to score at least 2 more goals to make up for tonight’s game.