NHL blows it again. Perception is everything and once again, they look bad.

So Aaron Rome was suspended for four games by the NHL and its new interim disciplinarian Mike Murphy. I like most were pretty shocked at the number of games. I figured the league would give Rome at least a game and probably two for the late hit.

It wasn’t a blindside hit; it was a late hit with a very unfortunate result. But Nathan Horton is done for the series with a severe concussion and in some respects it may be fair that Aaron Rome misses the remainder of the final as well.

I accept the suspension as a fan, but I what I cannot accept is the part of the process that was used to arrive at the decision. This from the NHL transcript of the decision:

Q.  Is there a formula equating playoff games to regular-season games?

MIKE MURPHY:  Yes.  It’s more severe.

Q.  Is there a number?

MIKE MURPHY: No.  I wish there was a number.  There’s not.  You have to feel that.  I know in the past when we had a playoff suspension, I remember the Pronger elbow going back, the Lemieux hit going on, that was two, Pronger was one.  I spoke to the gentleman who issued the two.  Wanted his formula, talked to him about it.  I’m talking about Brian Burke.  I don’t like to mention people who I deal with.  He was one gentleman who I did speak with. There’s a lot of other people I spoke with, too, not just Brian.

Excuse me?

The NHL is truly stupid sometimes. How does it look when you go to another team’s GM, a GM that was fired by the Vancouver Canucks and ask him his opinion on a suspension? Employees of other teams should never be consulted on discipline issues, period. The optics of that move are absurd but until last night with Nathan Horton lying concussed on the ice, the NHL has never cared about optics. So should fans now be wondering if Colin Campbell was “consulted”? The man that excused himself of his role prior to the start of the series, saying it had nothing to do with his son playing for the Bruins? Sure, I’m getting the conspiracy thing going, but the way the NHL runs things they really don’t give you much of a choice.

I do believe that Burke was probably neutral in his recommendations to Murphy but the NHL has to be smarter in the roles that conflicting parties have in these decisions.

Before I start getting blasted by profanity laced comments and being labeled a homer, read above again. I accept and to some degree agree with the suspension based on the fact that Horton is “out for the series.” In the future the NHL better give a little more thought to who it “consults” on discipline issues. If they can’t do it within their own league office circles and not consult GM’s of other teams then that is a major flaw in the process and one that makes the NHL look bush league…again.

 

 

For all the marbles: Canucks and Bruins Stanley Cup Final Preview/Prediction

I’ve been running this site since 1996 so I have yet to have the privilege of covering a Stanley Cup Final. Years of hoping and waiting have finally ended, and here we are with the Canucks in the finals for the 3rd time in their 40 year history. It’s been an exhausting playoffs and it seems like forever since they started. The NHL’s brilliant plan to wait so long to start the final haven’t helped but here we sit on the verge of the biggest playoff series in Canucks history.

So here we have it, our last preview of the playoffs, as we take a look at the Canucks and Bruins, for all the marbles.

Canucks and Boston - Photo Credit: Richard Lam/Getty Images

Canucks and Boston - Photo Credit: Richard Lam/Getty Images



If the NHL wanted two of the best teams in the NHL, they certainly got it. That said the two teams are built very differently. Vancouver built on depth and speed and the flexibility to play multiple styles. The Bruins are built on toughness, hard work and solid defense. The Canucks have proven over the course of the regular season and in the playoffs that they can play any style you want to, and they attempt to dictate what style their opponents play as well. Can the Bruins play multiple styles and adapt to a faster Western Conference? They did in the only meeting between the two clubs this year, leaving Rogers Arena with a 3-1 win.

The keys to the series:

The Canucks are the favourites in the series and with good reason. We all know they ran away with the President’s Trophy and have been picked by many to win it all. To beat Boston, the Canucks are going to have to use their speed to make Boston’s defenders chase them. Puck movement, getting to open spaces quickly and efficiently will be crucial to Vancouver’s success.

The defensive pairing of Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg will be assigned to contain the Sedin twins who returned to form against the Sharks. The Bruins have strong penalty killing led by Chara and goaltender Tim Thomas and if the Canucks are to be successful their five on five play has to be better than it was against San Jose where they did most of their damage on the power play. They have to generate more shots at even strength, more quality chances, and get Tim Thomas moving in the net.

If the series becomes a parade to the penalty box the Canucks chances are likely increased, as long as that parade includes both teams. The Bruins power play has been brutal in the playoffs and that’s being kind. The Canucks however have been very effective.

For Boston to win they need to control the Sedin line. The twins struggled to find space against Chicago’s Seabrook and Keith and Nashville’s Weber and Suter. They thrived against the Sharks who don’t have a defensive pairing of the ilk of Chara and Seidenberg. But the Bruins will also need to pay attention to Ryan Kesler, who will have used the lengthy break to get as close to 100% as possible and who almost single handedly led the Canucks against Nashville. Kesler may revert to a defensive role again, concentrating on shutting down the Bruins big line of Milan Lucic, David Krejci and Nathan Horton. But the Bruins roll four lines consistently, and the Canucks may be forced to do the same if they want to keep fresh legs out there. With Vancouver’s fourth line a revolving door, Alain Vigneault may have to find a trio he can stick with and give them more minutes. That will require relying on some youth, particularly if Manny Malhotra can’t get the green light to play.

Both teams sport pests that will attempt to get under the oppositions skin. The Canucks Torres and Lappiere will counter Boston’s Brad Marchand.

The biggest battle however will be between two Vezina finalists in Roberto Luongo and Tim Thomas. In three career starts against Vancouver, Thomas has allowed just one goal. Not a large body of work, but it does indicate what impact Thomas can have in a seven game series. Luongo has been solid after a speed bump against the Hawks and despite some untimely goals at times has played a huge role in the success of his team. His performance in game 5 against San Jose was one of his best ever.

Both teams will attempt to get traffic in front of the net and the Bruins have the bigger bodies to do just that. The Canucks defense will have to be at their best to allow Luongo to see the puck as much as possible. The Bruins will have to contend mostly with Kesler and Burrows who will see a lot of Mr. Chara and will have to pay the price. The Canucks have generated fourteen goals from their defence to Boston’s eight and whatever team can get their back end involved will have a great advantage.

If you’re into stats, here is a nice little package compiled by James Mirtle at the Globe & Mail. By the numbers this could be an incredible final and a very competitive one. It could go down the wire but for some reason I just have a gut feeling the Canucks are a team of destiny. They have been the best team in the league almost from start to finish. They have demonstrated they can play any style they need to and in my opinion they are deeper than the Bruins.

The Bruins will put up a tough fight and the games will be close. But I think the Canucks find a way to win this series in six games and win the first Stanley Cup in franchise history and what an incredible end to an amazing 40th anniversary season that would be.

Little time to exhale: Canucks & Predators Preview

After an emotional and exhausting series against the Blackhawks the Canucks and their fans have little time to exhale. The second round of the march to the Stanley Cup will begin just two days after the epic series against the Hawks, and the Nashville Predators will provide the opposition when the puck drops Thursday evening at Rogers Arena.

Canucks fans may think the toughest task has been conquered with the win over arch rival Chicago, but if they think the Predators will be a cake walk, they should think again.

They may not have the biggest names you’ve heard of, but former Predator and current Canuck Dan Hamhuis warns that the team from the “Music City” should not be taken lightly.

“On paper it may not look like they have as good of a team as others, but they’re a very good team and we don’t want that to surprise us or fool us,” Hamhuis said. “They had 99 points during the regular season, and they’re in the second round for a reason. They’re going to be a very tough opponent.”

The Predators play an aggressive pressure style of hockey and their strength is on defence, led by the duo of Shea Weber and Ryan Suter. There is also the matter of solving the goaltending of Pekka Rinne who has quickly established himself as one of the league’s top netminders.

The two teams split their season series, with each team winning 2 games.

Let’s take a look at we feel are the keys to the series for the Canucks to advance.

The Sedins must contribute more:

Daniel and Henrik Sedin didn’t have a horrible series against the Hawks. Daniel did finish the series with 7 points (5-2) while Henrik finished with 5 assists. But clearly if the Canucks are to keep advancing they twins have to more prominent.  None of Henrik’s points came on the power play while just 2 of Daniel’s did. This is where the twins have to be effective. They will also have to more effective 5 on 5. Dave Bolland may be gone but the twins will likely see a lot of Weber and Suter whenever they step over the boards and don’t be surprised to see Jordan Tootoo or Mike Fisher in the twins face whenever possible.

Luongo versus Rinne:

Roberto Luongo got rid of more than a monkey off his back with the win in game 7 against Chicago, it as more like an elephant. After two tough games where he could have sued his teammates for lack of support and surviving the switch to Cory Schneider in game 6, Luongo persevered to have a strong game 7 including a huge save in overtime while the Canucks were shorthanded to give Burrows a chance to get the winner. It will remain to be seen if this lifted weight will allow Roberto to get back in the zone that he enjoyed for much of the regular season, one that saw him named a finalist for the Vezina trophy.

The problem with that is the guy at the other end was just as good. Pekka Rinne is not only a co-finalist with Luongo for the Vezina, he’s also become one of the best young goaltenders in the league and has the ability to steal games all by himself. With the scare the Canucks got going up against Corey Crawford in round one, they will need to find away to get to Rinne who is seldom shaken off his game. That said he didn’t have the greatest series against Anaheim, and some are wondering if he’s feeling the huge workload that many felt Luongo suffered from in playoffs past.

Coaching:

Barry Trotz - Photo: Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

Barry Trotz - Photo: Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

Few coaches have had the lifespan of Barry Trotz. He’s survived the lean years in Nashville by always getting the most out of his players and he hasn’t always had the best crop to work with. Trotz’s teams are defined by one thing work ethic and there is no doubt he has the Predators working as hard as ever this year. For a team that wasn’t known for scoring goals during the regular season, they’re also doing that, averaging 3.67 goals per game and 31.67 shots. Both of those totals are better than Vancouver’s

Alain Vigneault will need to find ways to get the Sedin’s free of the tight checking they will face. He’ll need to devise a plan to work the Predators down low and tire out their talented defense, much like they did when they were on their game against Chicago. He’ll also need to keep his team focused and sharp after an emotional first round that no doubt was a tough mental test for his squad. That pressure has been averted, but a slow start in this series will bring it all back again. Vigneault needs to find away to make sure it doesn’t.

Ryan Kesler:

Against the Hawks, Ryan Kesler was given the job of shutting down Jonathon Toews and for the most part he did an outstanding job. That task may have been handed to the injured Manny Malhotra in a perfect world, but Kesler accepted it openly and sacrificed his offense in the process. Kesler will still be used in that role, but there should be chances in this series to contribute more offensively as well and the Canucks will need his offense to help solve Rinne.

Intangibles:

Continue offense from Alex Burrows, more contributions from the third and fourth lines, better power play efficiency and penalty killing. All are important facets to ensure the Canucks advance to the next round. Did they learn a lesson against the Blackhawks? One would have to think so. The quick turnaround will be interesting. The Predators have been sitting waiting, while the Canucks just faced probably the most pressure they have ever faced as an organization. Will they be riding momentum come puck drop, or will they still be exhaling?

Nashville will be getting injured offensive threat Martin Erat back in the lineup. They have just won their first playoff series as a franchise and will be hungry for more. But will they have to face the same learning curve this Canucks team did to get to this point? They have the lineup to make things very difficult for Vancouver, and they’ll need a complete team effort to beat them.

Prediction:

Game one may be a tough one for Vancouver to get going in. They will either be flat from the effort expended Tuesday night, or they will be still riding the momentum and come out strong, knowing that what happened in the last season cannot happen again. Nashville has nothing to lose playing heavily favoured Vancouver and will be loose and rested. In the end the Canucks will draw on their experience from round one. If they stay healthy and play their game this series will be over on 6 games and the Canucks will be on their way to their first conference final since 1994.

Best Canucks Memory: Share yours to win a signed Dan Hamhuis jersey!

I’m back from Vegas and while I left all my money there, it doesn’t mean I need to be as stingy as a slot machine, so we’re having a contest!

With the Canucks celebrating their 40th anniversary season, there are many memorable Canucks moments that fans can recollect. Some may be game related, some may not be but everyone has one.

To celebrate those moments we asked our writers to give us their favourite Canucks moment, and we’re asking you to do the same. In return for your input and a couple of other criteria you’ll get a chance to win a signed Dan Hamhuis jersey, courtesy of CanucksCorner.com and the Vancouver Canucks.

What do you have to do to for a chance to win?

  • Comment below with your favourite Canucks memory.
  • If you’re not a fan of our Facebook page, please become one!
  • Tweet the following: “I shared a #Canucks memory @CanucksCorner for a chance to win a signed Dan Hamhuis jersey from @VanCanucks! http://tinyurl.com/4gdzehz”

As an added bonus, Justine Galo is throwing in a $50.00 gift certificate to the Canucks team store for another lucky winner!

We’ll run this contest for a couple of weeks and then choose the winners via a random draw. Good luck!

Canuckscorner.com favourite Canucks memories

Brian Wawryshyn

My favourite Canucks memory is as a kid, hanging out on the bowels of the Pacific Colosseum. My dad would take us down after a game and we would wait for the players to come out of the dressing room to sign our autograph books. Just a wide eyed kid who was in awe of players like Stan Smyl, Thomas Gradin, Harold Snepsts, Bill Derlago, Rick Lanz and many others. It was a different time, when players were more accessible, and they would walk out of the dressing room past waiting fans. It was the beginning of my life as Canucks fan, and I’ll never forget it.

Justine Galo

Yes, this has got to be most memorable moment. My then three year old daughter was hooked on hockey. It was great to see her cheer for our boys and see her reaction to the crowd and take in the atmosphere of a hockey game. She got her hot dog, her drink, her Canucks shirt and she was all set and very happy. Passing on the love of hockey to my child to me is my most fond memory. It’s wonderful to know that she can share something I am so passionate about.

Yeah those are some pretty big memories for me as a hockey fan, and especially a Canuck fan. I just wanted to share them with you all out there. Remember why you love this team and why you love hockey. It’s beyond what goes on in the game.

Jason Kurylo

My family was not rich by any means, so Vancouver Canucks games even back in the day were stretching the household budget. Also, my dad had long since tired of the bloody knuckled fisticuffs of the Broad Street Bullies and the Big Bad Bruins. My mom knew how much I loved hockey, though, and saved pennies to take me to one game for my birthday every year. Thus, my favourite Canucks memory is actually a collection of games over the years, always in February, and usually that game was against those very same Boston Bruins.

Back in the 70s, the Canucks were perennial also rans. They were our team, you know – the Dunc Wilsons, Don Levers and Ron Sedlbauers. Later, the Harold Snepsts, Stan Smyls and Thomas Gradins. But most years there wasn’t much to cheer for come springtime. So people here were Canucks fans in the regular season, but we had a playoff team. Mine was Boston. I was too young to see Bobby Orr play in person, sadly – but I did see Rick Middleton, Terry O’Reilly, Jean Ratelle, and my favourite goalie to this very day, Gerry Cheevers. Every year, I got to see NHL hockey for my birthday – my two teams – and it was a special night out for this young lad and his mom. The Bs really were big and bad – and the Canucks offered up fists and lumber to match: Snepsts, Smyl, Curt Fraser, Tiger Williams, Ron Delorme, even Colin Campbell. (Yes, that Colin Campbell.) Games usually wound up with the Bruins winning, but along the way there were as many players in the penalty boxes as on the benches. It was all a nine-year-old boy could hope for.

One year, Stan Smyl took a slapshot from centre ice that was so hard, it got stuck in the Boston goalie’s skate. The referees, the players, even Stan himself had no idea where the puck was for a good 30 seconds. At that time, there was no instant soft rock streaming through overly loud speakers. The organist was too curious as to the puck’s location to play anything. The whole arena buzzed over the mystery – “Huh?” “Wha–?” “Where’d it go?” Finally when the puck was located, everyone in the building had a good laugh as the organist finally gained his senses and played a Vaudeville rag.

Today I can’t stand the fisticuffs in the game. Okay, if two talented players get pissed off at each other and throw down the mitts, fine. I just have no time for full-time enforcers, players with hands of stone who line up at centre ice and choreograph fights before the puck is dropped. As much cement as they had between their ears, guys like Williams and O’Reilly could genuinely play the game. Old-time hockey, it was, and it holds a special place in my heart.

James Edgington

Whilst I have witnessed through magic of television some amazing Canucks moments, I am confident my best and most memorable Canucks experience is yet to happen. This will be when I have the opportunity to indulge 1st hand the atmosphere, energy and pride in standing shoulder to shoulder with fellow Canucks fans. Solidifing my long distance passion for the team.

Living in England and enduring the minuscule coverage of the NHL and hockey, I am sorry to say that I missed the defining Canucks moments such as the ’82 and ’94 cup runs and have been unable to witness many of the great Canucks players.  The UK launched it’s fourth TV channel in 1982 and this was the only channel to show over seas sports.  Sadly hockey wasn’t included in this.

That said, to date my proudest memory as a Canucks fan was seeing my beautiful new born little girl sporting a Vancouver Canucks baby grow.  She’s now two and a half and with little to no encouragement will pick up anything hockey stick shaped and pretend to skate.  I’m sure every Dad will identify with the chest swelling emotion of sharing their sport with their child.  So no, I have yet to experience the Canucks 1st hand but I know that when I do, one of the fellow Canuck fans standing there, will be my little girl.

Canucks Ring of Honour: Who is worthy of “The Ring”

As we all know, the Vancouver Canucks are celebrating their 40th anniversary season in 2010-2011. As part of the celebrations, the club has introduced the Ring of Honour . Four times this season, the Canucks will induct a player from their 40 years of NHL hockey that have made lasting impressions on the team’s fans and the organization.

The first inductee, Orland Kurtenbach, will be inducted this Tuesday, October 26th. Kurtenbach was of course the team’s first captain and played four seasons with the Canucks, before coaching them for two. He is a resident of the lower mainland and an active member of the Vancouver Canucks Alumni.

That leaves three other inductees yet to be named by the team. Who should be the other three?

For me personally, there has to be certain criteria met.

  • You put in several years of service to the team.
  • You represented the team and the city with class.
  • You have contributed to the organization or the city outside of the game.

If it was up to me, I would have no problem including the following three players to round out the four inductions for this season. You may agree or you may have your own list based on your own criteria. Feel free to comment and post your choices below!

Kirk McLean – Goaltender

Kirk McLeanCaptain Kirk McLean played 11 seasons for the Canucks and was one of the main reasons the Canucks went to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1994. “The save” in overtime of game seven against Calgary is still the single biggest save in Canucks history. His 52 save performance in Game 1 of the finals that same year, is still one of the greatest games a goaltender has ever played, period. McLean was one of the last “stand up” goaltenders and his tall frame frustrated many a shooter. His ability to keep cool no matter how much pressure he faced was another asset he possessed.

McLean’s name is prominent amongst the club’s all-time goaltending records:

  • 1st in games played: 516
  • 1st in wins: 211
  • 2nd all-time in shutouts (20)
  • 1st in playoff games played: 68
  • 1st in playoff shutouts: 6
  • 1st in playoff wins: 34
  • 3rd in playoff goals against average: 2.84
  • 2nd in playoff save percentage: .907

McLean has made Vancouver his home and is a business owner in the community and also makes appearances on behalf of the club’s alumni. He’s one of Vancouver’s most recognizable sports figures of all-time.

Freelance hockey writer Joe Pelletier who runs GreatestHockeyLegends.com did this nice feature on McLean.

Harold Snepsts  – Defence

Harold SnepstsAffectionately known as “Haaaaaaarooold” by the Canucks faithful, Harold Snepsts patrolled the blueline for the Canucks for 12 seasons. He wasn’t flashy, and didn’t rack up a lot of points but he was steady and played with a mean streak. He was a two time all-star and was a member of the 1982 team that went to the Stanley Cup Finals.

With his trademark moustache, aggressive play and pleasant demeanour off the ice, Snepsts quickly became a fan favourite deserves to be recognized on the Ring of Honour.

Snepsts has come full circle in his career with the Canucks and is now employed as an amateur scout by the team and  is still to this day one of the most popular Canucks of all-time.

Thomas Gradin

Thomas GradinThomas Gradin  was the Canucks first legitimate star, scoring twenty or more goals seven different times for Vancouver. During the Canucks 1982 playoff run Gradin posted nineteen points. Gradin had his greatest success when teamed with linemates Stan Smyl and Curt Fraser, and the smooth skating swede excited fans with his masterful stick handling and smooth passes. There were many that felt that Gradin never reached his full potential with the club, likely due to the sub-par teams he played with throughout his career when he was basically the offence of the club.

Gradin spent eight seasons as a Canuck and ended his career with the Boston Bruins. Today, Gradin is a key member of the club’s scouting staff with the official title of Associate Head Scout.

So, those are the three players that I would choose and there are many others deserving of the recognition.

Leave us your choices or comments!

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